Vegan “Egg” Salad with Avocado Mayo

It’s hard to think of a more celebrated fruit than the avocado. With instagram feeds full of beautifully sliced avocado, it’s clear they are having their time in the spotlight. Like most trendy foods, there is a good reason behind their popularity. Avocados are a powerhouse of healthy fats, dietary fiber, vitamins and minerals with proven health benefits. We incorporate both fresh avocado and avocado oil in our recipe to maximize the benefits.

We have come a long way from the days of deeming all dietary fat as evil. Now, we know that there are good fats and bad fats. The good fats are generally unsaturated fats. Avocados are loaded with monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), which have been linked to multiple dietary benefits. MUFAs have been shown to help increase the bioavailability of carotenoids, like those in the red peppers in this recipe (1).

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Vegan “Egg” Salad with Avocado Mayo

  • Author: Danielle Moore
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 0 minutes
  • Total Time: 10 minutes
  • Yield: 2 1x
Scale

Ingredients

For the Avocado Mayo

For the “Egg” Salad

  • 1 1/2 cup Eden Organic Garbanzo Beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 t turmeric
  • 1/4 t black pepper
  • 1/2 t Vedica Organics Black Salt 
  • 1/4 cup red onion, small diced
  • 1/4 cup celery, small diced
  • 1/4 cup dill, chopped
  • 1/2 cup red pepper, sliced
  • 1/2 cup cucumber, sliced
  • 2 cups salad greens
  • 1/4 cup sprouts

Instructions

For the Avocado Mayo

  1. In a food processor or high speed blender, combine all ingredients until smooth

For the “Egg” Salad

  1. In a bowl, mash chickpeas with a potato masher or the back of a fork until chunky
  2. Add avocado mayo, turmeric, black pepper, black salt, half of dill, red onion and celery and stir to combine
  3. Divide salad greens between 2 plates then top with sliced pepper, sliced cucumber and a scoop of “egg” salad then garnish with remaining dill and sprouts

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1 salad
  • Calories: 312.4
  • Sugar: 8.8
  • Sodium: 371.5
  • Fat: 13.6
  • Saturated Fat: 1.6
  • Unsaturated Fat: 9.7
  • Trans Fat: 0
  • Carbohydrates: 40.3
  • Fiber: 13.1
  • Protein: 11.4
  • Cholesterol: 0

Keywords: gluten free, egg free, soy free, grain free, vegan, dairy free

Unlike other fruits, avocados are quiet low in sugar. They are also high in dietary fiber. Fiber has been shown to help regulate blood sugar and decrease large spikes (2). It has the ability to slow digestion and increase satiety while feeding healthy gut bacteria (3).

Studies on avocados are surprisingly uncommon, although interest is increasing. Current studies have provided some mixed results, but they all seem to agree that avocados are beneficial in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. One study showed that people on a moderate fat, cholesterol-lowering diet can benefit from incorporating 1 avocado per day into their routine, which lowered cholesterol, especially the bad (LDL) cholesterol (4). Another systematic review saw no difference in LDL cholesterol but saw an increase in the good (HDL) cholesterol (5). 

Utilizing the results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), one study sought to investigate how avocado consumption affected overall diet quality, weight management and heart disease risk factors. This study showed that people who regularly eat avocado had significantly higher fruit and vegetable intake. They also had an overall better quality to their diets, including increased unsaturated fats, dietary fiber and essential vitamins and minerals. These vitamins and minerals included Vitamin E, Vitamin K, magnesium and potassium. Further, their diets contained less added sugar. Their good (HDL) cholesterol was higher and their waist circumference was lower than those not regularly including avocado in their diet. People who consumed avocados regularly had a 50% lower odds ratio for heart disease risk factors (1). Further studies are needed to evaluate how these dietary patterns correlate and how they can be applied in our journey to better wellness.

Another strength the research can agree upon is the antioxidant potential of avocados. Their antioxidant content has been shown to provide neuro-protective effects against age-related diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. This protection comes form the antioxidants ability to reduce oxidative stress. Oxidative stress can cause damage to the neurons, which has been observed in these diseases (6). 

Personalize It

If you’re avoiding oil, the avocado oil in our recipe can easily be swapped for extra water or lemon juice. For those on a lower fat diet, cut the avocado back to 1/4 avocado or try 1-2 Tbsp yogurt or dairy-free yogurt in place of avocado. You can craft the “egg” salad to your taste by swapping out vegetables, spices and herbs.


Recipe compatibility with your diet type

Everyday
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1–2 times per week
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This recipe has been custom designed for California Coastal, Forager, Lean Machine, Mediterranean, Modified Paleo, Mosaic, Nordic, Paleo Plus, Pescetarian and Urban Grazer diet types, learn more.

Danielle Moore

Danielle Moore is a professional recipe developer, Nutrition expert, food photographer and lover of veggies. Read her full bio here.

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