One Pot Ratatouille

Ratatouille is an essential summertime stew. It’s loaded with the best produce the warmer months have to offer. The classic, simple seasoning perfectly highlights the brilliant flavors of summer squash, eggplant and tomatoes. Bonus — you’ll only dirty one pot!

This dish features two classic summer squash: zucchini and yellow squash. Both have been studied for their high nutrient density and possible medicinal applications. They are packed with phytochemicals, providing incredible antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and antiviral potential (R).

At the

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One Pot Ratatouille

  • Author: Danielle Moore
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 30 minutes
  • Total Time: 35 minutes
  • Yield: 2 1x
Scale

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. In a heavy bottom pot or Dutch oven, heat 2 Tbsp water over medium
  2. Add onions, bell pepper, and garlic then cook 1-2 minutes
  3. Add vegetable broth, crushed tomatoes, eggplant, zucchini, yellow squash, tomatoes, thyme sprigs, paprika, dried rosemary, lemon juice, and salt and pepper to taste
  4. Bring to a boil then reduce heat to low and simmer 25-30 minus, until sauce is slightly thickened and veggies are tender
  5. Scoop into bowls then garnish with fresh basil

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1/2 of recipe
  • Calories: 106.2
  • Sugar: 13.5
  • Sodium: 271.5
  • Fat: 0.9
  • Saturated Fat: 0.2
  • Unsaturated Fat: 0.39
  • Trans Fat: 0
  • Carbohydrates: 23.6
  • Fiber: 6.2
  • Protein: 4.7
  • Cholesterol: 0

Keywords: dairy free, egg free, gluten free, grain free, oil free, soy free, vegan

What is Ratatouille?

Like most delicious culinary classics, Ratatouille originated in France. It’s a tomato-based stew with hints of garlic, thyme and rosemary. At the peak of summer season, vegetables like eggplant, zucchini and tomatoes are incredibly abundant, making this the perfect way to prepare and preserve those veggies. It’s a great way to add color and variety to your vegetable game!

What other vegetables work in this recipe?

If you’re looking to make some veggie swaps, keep spring/summer produce in mind. I love adding green beans, snap peas and fresh greens. You can also throw in some carrots or even corn.

Can I make it spicy?

For me, the answer to this is always yes! Summer time is a the season of peppers. I like to add sliced jalapeño to mine just before serving. You can also add a bit of cayenne or crushed red pepper to the sauce as it simmers.

Can I freeze this stew?

Yes and no. Yes, it will keep in the freezer and the flavors will be great when you heat it up. But no, you will not preserve the consistency. The freezing and defrosting process will result in a mushier stew than you started with. This isn’t always a bad thing. You’ve got two options to maximize this texture change:

  1. Throw it all in the blender for a delicious, flavorful pureed soup.
  2. Serve it as a sauce over pasta, cauliflower rice or other freshly cooked vegetables.

How can I add even more depth to the flavor of the sauce?

You can’t really go wrong with an onion/garlic/tomato combination, but some occasions call for a little more flavor depth. The trick to building deep flavor is deglazing, which is just a fancy pants word for adding an acid then scraping up the delicious bits at the bottom of the pan. I love using 1-2 Tablespoons of balsamic vinegar or 1/4 cup red wine before adding the chicken broth. You’ll notice a big difference from this one step.


Recipe compatibility with your diet type

Everyday
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Never, or 2–4 times per month
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This recipe has been custom designed for California Coastal, Forager, Lean Machine, Mediterranean, Modified Paleo, Mosaic, Nordic, Okinawan, Paleo Plus, Pescetarian, Urban Grazer and Wayoan diet types, learn more.

Danielle Moore

Danielle Moore is a professional recipe developer, Nutrition expert, food photographer and lover of veggies. Read her full bio here.

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